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Lyme's Disease

By Dr. Shawn Messonnier, DVM
Updated: 2009-05-15 5:28 PM 2569 Views    Category: - General Pet Care
 
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Lyme's disease is one of 3 diseases in pets caused by a rickettsial organism (rickettsia are a type of bacteria.) Your pet cannot get the disease simply by exposure to an infected pet. Transmission occurs when the pet is bitten by an infected tick, which serves as the intermediate host for the disease. As the tick attaches and feeds on the pet, the Lyme’s disease organism is transferred from the body of the tick into the bloodstream of the pet. Once inside the pet, the organism infects certain white blood cells, multiplies, and spreads throughout the body.
 
Clinical signs of disease depends upon which organ or tissue is infected by the Lyme’s disease organism. In general, arthritis and kidney disease are most commonly seen.
 
People can also contract Lyme’s disease, and the condition is usually more severe in people than in pets. As is the case with pets, people must be bitten by infected ticks in order to become infected. This demonstrates the importance of proper tick control. By controlling ticks, the incidence of rickettsial diseases can be reduced and even eliminated.
 
There are several methods of tick control available. Both conventional and complementary methods are effective. Conventional methods usually involve chemical collars, sprays, topical spot-on products, and dips. Collars are notorious for being ineffective in controlling external parasites on pets; however, a new tick collar containing the chemical amitraz is effective in preventing ticks from attaching to the pet. Sprays, spot-ons, and dips are effective. However, many pet owners worry about health hazards to themselves and their pets from exposure to the potent chemicals contained in the products. While the occasional use of the products can be safely recommended for pets with potential exposure to large numbers of ticks, in general the more natural methods are safer for pets.
 
Natural preventive methods of tick control involve herbs or volatile oils. These can be applied to the pet as topical products including dips and cloth herbal flea and tick collars. Herbs which have shown anti-parasite properties include those which are given orally to the pet as well as those which can be applied topically. Oral herbs include garlic, burdock root, dandelion, and red clover. Topical herbs include feverfew, pyrethrum (from Chysanthemum,) mullein (available as Rotenone,) and Canadian fleabane.
 
Volatile oils that may be effective include geranium oil (rose geranium,) pennyroyal oil, lavender oil, and citrus oils (which contain d-limonene.) These oils are generally safe. However, pennyroyal oil has been associated with fatalities in dogs and is not recommended due to the narrow safety margin. Properly diluting the stock oil is very important in preventing toxicity; undiluted oils are often more toxic than the conventional chemical products currently available. Because of safety concerns and the fact that cats have a more difficult time detoxifying many chemical compounds, it is best to avoid using most essential oils on cats.
 
Other natural therapies which can have insecticidal properties include neem, citronella, diatomaceous earth, sodium polysorbate, and beneficial nematodes.
 
Because Lyme’s disease is an infectious disease and can lead to serious problems if not treated properly, I prefer an integrated approach to treating infected pets. Therefore, I combine both conventional medications with complementary therapies.
 
Conventional medications that are effective against the Lyme’s disease organism include amoxicillin and doxycycline. I integrate antibiotic therapy with supplements that can help boost the immune system and exhibit antibacterial properties. Supplements that fall into this category include Echinacea, arabinogalactans, colostrums, olive leaf extract, and even the homeopathic Lyme nosode. To minimize the insult that antibiotics (especially tetracyclines like doxycycline) can cause to the GI tract, I like to add probiotics to my treatment regimen.Using this integrative approach maximizes the pet’s chance of recovery while minimizing side effects.
 
There is a vaccine for Lyme’s disease. However, the vaccine can cause a false positive Lyme’s blood test, is not extremely effective, and can produce side effects that mimic the disease. While there are individual instances where the vaccine might be beneficial, it should not be thought of as 100% effective in preventing the disease and most pets will not need the vaccination.
 
In summary, Lyme’s disease is an important tick-borne disease that can affect pets as well as pet owners. The decision regarding vaccination is best left to a discussion between pet owner and veterinarian, and the vaccine should not be considered 100% protective. Preventing tick exposure is vitally important in preventing the disease, and there are a number of effective preventive measures and therapies for infected pets from which to choose. If therapy is needed, an integrative approach helps the pet recover quickly while minimizing side effects.
 

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Dr. Messonnier, a 1987 graduate of Texas A&M College of Veterinary Medicine, opened Paws & Claws Animal Hospital in 1991. His special interests include exotic pets, dermatology, and animal behavior. Dr. Messonnier is a well-known speaker and author. In addition to serving clients, he is a regular contributor to several veterinary journals, sits on the advisory board of the journal Veterinary Forum and regularly consults with veterinarians across the country and is a holistic pet columnist for Animal Wellness, Body + Soul, and Veterinary Forum. More info can be found at http://www.petcarenaturally.com.
 
 
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