Go Back   Pet Forums - Yeepet > Birds > Bird Health & Care
Register FAQ Members List Calendar Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Sad bird story :(

Bird Health & Care


Reply
Thread Tools Display Modes
#1
Old 07-27-2008, 07:01 PM
a.doyle a.doyle is offline
Senior Member
Your Profile Picture
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Los Angeles, CA, US
Posts: 377
Unhappy Sad bird story :(

Here's the only bird story that is personal to me

We had a Sun Conure growing up named Matisse. He was beautiful, smart and loved going everywhere with us. He was supposed to live 25-30 years as his brethren! However, not long after we got him he started picking at himself and wouldn't stop. It was scary and we didn't know what to do - he would keep pecking his chest violently, making it bleed and scar. Otherwise, he acted normal. He was still very lovable, would ride on our shoulders, even liked our dogs and ... well, he would have liked our cats if we had trusted our cats to get near him. But he wouldn't stop this pecking and so we took him to the vet. The vet fashioned a little Elizabethan collar for him and said he'd research the issue, as he was as confused as we were. It didn't take him long to call back and the news was bad. It was a psychological disease, he said -- rare, but the birds can pick up habits and then just continue to do them without thinking. He wasn't bored - we played with him and interacted often, and because it happened so early after we got him, the vet thought it was probably due to something previous in his life. There was no cure.

We were devastated, especially my brother who had grown very attached to him. The pecking got worse and Matisse was smart enough to be able to wiggle and peck his way out of his collar and soon his chest was a mass of scars. The vet said the humane option, as he would continue to do this, was to euthanize. Thankfully, we were young enough that my dad agreed to this step even though I think he would have just liked to go dispose of the bird his OWN way and not have to pay the euthanization fee.

For some time afterwards, my siblings and I casually talked about getting another bird at some point, but I think the experience was too traumatizing and tragic -- we never did adopt another.
__________________
Dogs think every day is Christmas - R. Bradbury

Last edited by a.doyle : 07-27-2008 at 07:04 PM.

#2
Old 07-28-2008, 09:07 AM
Hollie Hollie is offline
Member
Your Profile Picture
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Renfrew, 56, UK
Posts: 66
Post oh so sad

That is a really sad story and reminds me of a similar thing Bo used to do to her undercarriage. She would pluck and pluck and pluck alarming amounts off her coat and line her whole cage. I sought advice from the vet and he said that she was having what was termed a phantom pregnancy. So she was preparing a home for her babies, which of course never arrived. She would not come out to play much in the days following the 'nesting', I think it was a minor grieving period.

When talking about your Dads preferred option for euthanasia it reminds me of my own Dad's actions after our 118th hamster passed away as the once elaborate coffins were replaced with ill-fitting cardboard boxes.

#3
Old 07-28-2008, 10:44 AM
a.doyle a.doyle is offline
Senior Member
Your Profile Picture
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Los Angeles, CA, US
Posts: 377
Post re: Dads

Yeah, **sigh** they come from a different period and have to keep their "manliness" up. Mine, at least, now tells me how silly he thought all our pet burials were. "And expensive!" He complains - we've always cremated our dogs when they pass away and then have a little ceremony to spread their ashes somewhere, and apparently vets get you for those cremation fees + the little urns they give you. But to his credit, he never once complained or mumbled when we were younger. It's only now he thinks we're old enough to handle it
__________________
Dogs think every day is Christmas - R. Bradbury

#4
Old 02-23-2009, 06:48 AM
Pupperoo Pupperoo is offline
Junior Member
Your Profile Picture
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: Tucson, AZ, US
Posts: 2
Default A story of rescue and hope

A friend called one day and told me his next door neighbors had gotten into drug addiction and been jailed. They left behind a small blue and white female parakeet in a large cage. Why the police didn't notify the local animal control or humane society is a mystery.
My friend, knowing that I am a bird person asked about the care and feeding of the little bird. After I explained some basics, he suggested that I take the budgie named "Blueberry". I haven't had a bird in many years. I said sure I'll take care of her. When I got there to pick up the bird and her cage I noticed the seed cup was full of only millet husks, no real food at all. I mentioned this and he said he thought it was full of seed and she was just a slow eater. She had been abandoned for a week, my friend had her for another week.
I picked up some parakeet blend on my way home and as soon as I released her back into her cage she dove into her seed cup like a starving bird would.
She began to get active again and would whistle and chirp at me whenever I entered the room.
She sometimes would sit and play with one toy for hours and protect it like a baby. The signs of neurosis were becoming apparent. She missed having a mate. I found out later that she had a companion bird that had died in the cage during her abandonment. She was lonely for her mate.
I went to a pet shop and selected a big strong blue male. When I got him home, they both began to call out to each other. After an hour I released him into her large cage, expecting Blueberry to become aggressive. I stood by while they immediately began courting with excited chirps whistles and head bobbing.
They have now produced five clutches and continue to be totally in love with each other. Their babies are all beautiful, one is an albino. Blueberry shows little interest in the toy that was her substitute mate. She has a real mate and is happy and still in charge of the large cage. She now gets on my finger and gives me little nibbles. Her babies are thriving in their new homes. She has given back to me in her own way, by thriving and being the chief bird in her cage and my life.

PM | Profile | Pet Profile | Blogs | Groups | Friends
Reply With Quote
#5
Old 02-23-2009, 07:17 PM
Judy at Shady Grove Judy at Shady Grove is offline
Senior Member
Your Profile Picture
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Friendsville, PA, US
Posts: 278
Talking :o)

What a wonderful story! At first I thought it might turn out bad, but it turned out great! Thanks for sharing. Judy
__________________
Have a great day! Judy

#6
Old 05-18-2009, 09:01 AM
mjweber mjweber is offline
Junior Member
Your Profile Picture
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Warren, MI, US
Posts: 28
Default

My tiel, Mick, plucks just under his wings. My vet says it's because at some point he's had active giardia (all tiels have it--dormant) and is now hyper-sensitive to new feathers coming in. Poor baby

MJ

PM | Profile | Pet Profile | Blogs | Groups | Friends
Reply With Quote
#7
Old 05-29-2009, 10:47 AM
SanPedro SanPedro is offline
Member
Your Profile Picture
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Los Angeles, CA, US
Posts: 67
Default

Do the birdseed boxes warn about millet husks and how they look a lot like millet? I wish they did!

C

PM | Profile | Pet Profile | Blogs | Groups | Friends
Reply With Quote
#8
Old 06-04-2009, 09:09 PM
mjweber mjweber is offline
Junior Member
Your Profile Picture
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Warren, MI, US
Posts: 28
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by SanPedro View Post
Do the birdseed boxes warn about millet husks and how they look a lot like millet? I wish they did!

C
No, SanPedro, they don't. It's a matter of observation/learning, unfortunately.

MJ

PM | Profile | Pet Profile | Blogs | Groups | Friends
Reply With Quote
#9
Old 07-27-2010, 11:50 PM
BridgetM BridgetM is offline
Junior Member
Your Profile Picture
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Belmont, CA, US
Posts: 7
Default

It is good to hear that you were able to turn poor little budgie's life around. Most of my birds have been rescues as well. Either they were out and lost or a friend realized they couldn't care for them.

Plucking is a horrible problem and a lot of times it is due to boredom. It's incredibly difficult when it is physyiological or chemically caused because there isn't always something to do about it. I will be writing a blog about recognizing signs of illness and behavior problems in birds this week. My hope is that more bird owners will recognize signs of illness sooner so that they can get their birds to a vet before the problem becomes untreatable.

PM | Profile | Pet Profile | Blogs | Groups | Friends
Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump